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Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

2 edition of The British strategic nuclear force, July 1980 found in the catalog.

The British strategic nuclear force, July 1980

The British strategic nuclear force, July 1980

text of letters exchanged between the Prime Minister and the President of the United States and between the Secretary of State for Defence and the United StatesSecretary of Defense.

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Published by H.M.S.O. in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesCmnd -- 7979
ContributionsGreat Britain. Prime Minister.
The Physical Object
Pagination3p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14915573M
ISBN 100101797907
OCLC/WorldCa16552684

  A. Evolution of the British Nuclear Deterrent The UK first tested a nuclear device in October and deployed an operational nuclear weapons capability the following year. Initially, the British nuclear deterrent rested on the 10 kiloton2 Blue Danube free-fall bomb, carried by the V bombers of the Royal Air Force’s strategic bomber force. influence of the United States upon British decision-making, as well as the role that the British political elites’ belief in the necessity of an independent deterrent may play in Trident renewal in spite of strong counter-arguments. The British Dilemma In July , the Thatcher government and the Carter administration agreed the US sale.

Britain‟s Nuclear Command, Control and Operations Figure 2 Source: NATO Handbook, NATO, HBEN, , p In the V-force era, RAF Bomber Command, with headquarters at High Wycombe, was given the strategic nuclear duties of the UK. Due to the limitation of. Victor and Vulcan) of the RAF’s strategic bomber force from • A succession of air-launched nuclear weapons was developed during the late s and early s. Yellow Sun Mk.2 was the UK’s first operational thermonuclear weapon and was in service from to Blue Steel was the UK’s first nuclear.

Volume I of The Official History of the UK Strategic Nuclear Deterrent provides an authoritative and in-depth examination of the British government’s strategic nuclear policy from to Written with full access to the UK documentary record, this volume examines how British governments after tried to build and then maintain an independent, nationally controlled strategic nuclear Reviews: 1.   In July , a plane crashed in Suffolk, nearly detonating an atomic bomb. In January , an RAF truck carrying two hydrogen bombs skidded off a .


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The British strategic nuclear force, July 1980 Download PDF EPUB FB2

The United Kingdom, along with the United States and the Soviet Union, signed the Partial Test Ban Treaty, which restricted it to underground nuclear tests by outlawing testing in the atmosphere, underwater, or in outer space, on 5 August First fusion weapon test: 15 May The British Government announced its intention in July to modernize its strategic nuclear deterrent with the deployment of the Trident I (C4) submarine-launched ballistic missile.

The MIRVed Trident missile will have significantly increased capabilities of range, payload and target numbers. Book Description. Volume II of The Official History of the UK Strategic Nuclear Deterrent provides an authoritative and in-depth examination of the British government’s strategic nuclear policy from to Written with full access to the UK documentary record, Volume II examines the controversies that developed over nuclear policy following the arrival in office of a Labour.

Francis Pym, ‘The Future United Kingdom Strategic Nuclear Deterrent Force’, Defence Open Government Document 80/23 (Ministry of Defence, July ).

For some reason the Ministry seem to have wanted to keep this notable light under a bushel. It was not printed and published in the usual way as a White : James Cable.

Pierre, A. Nuclear Politics: The British Experience with an Independent Strategic Force (Oxford, Oxford University Press). Google Scholar Richelson, Jeffrey and Ball, Desmond () The Ties that Bind (Boston, Allen & Unwin).Author: Oliver Ramsbotham, Hugh Miall.

The Air Council decided on 7 July that Project E weapons would be phased out by Decemberby which time it was anticipated that there would be sufficient British megaton weapons to equip the entire strategic bomber force.

The first such submarine, Resolution, commenced patrol in Juneand control of the UK strategic nuclear force passed to the Royal Navy in July the following year.

Britain also developed a The British strategic nuclear force of tactical nuclear weapons, principally bombs, that were deployed on a number of land-based and carrier-based strike aircraft from the lates. The modern form of the British nuclear force was thus essentially reached.

Royal Navy submarines relieved the RAF of the nuclear deterrent mission inbut by that point, Bomber Command no longer existed. RAF Fighter Command and Bomber Command merged in to form Strike Command. RAF Coastal Command followed in November The Single Integrated Operational Plan (SIOP) was the United States' general plan for nuclear war from to The SIOP gave the President of the United States a range of targeting options, and described launch procedures and target sets against which nuclear weapons would be launched.

The plan integrated the capabilities of the nuclear triad of strategic bombers, land-based. Indian, French, British, and Pakistani strategic forces continue to be modernized and America and Russia continue to reduce their strategic nuclear deploy-ments, the next arms race will be run by a much larger number of contestants—with highly destructive stra-tegic capabilities far more closely matched and capable.

‘The British Strategic Nuclear Force’, July Text of letters exchanged between the Prime Minister and the President of the US and between the Secretary of State for Defence and the US Secretary of Defence.

Cmnd (London: HMSO). ‘The Future UK Strategic Nuclear Deterrent’, Defence Open Government Document (DOGD) 80/ July The Future of the United Kingdom Strategic Nuclear Deterrent Force, Defense Open Government.

Document 80/23 (London: Ministry of Defense, July ). The announcement was due to be made on Thursday, July 7, but early on the preceding. Quoted in Kristan Stoddart, ‘British Government Optioneering Studies on Alternative Nuclear Force Postures’, discussion paper presented at the workshop titled Stepping Down the Nuclear Ladder: Options for UK Nuclear Weapons Policy, Department of Peace Studies, University of Bradford, 17–18 September, contribute to NATO an independent strategic nuclear force was explained by the Secretary of State for Defence on 24 January to the House of Comons, which after debate backed the Government's policy by votes to A further account was given in paragraphs of the Statement on the Defence Estimates (Cmnd ).

1, strategic nuclear delivery vehicles.2 Under the terms of the Strategic Offensive Reduction Treaty (known as the Moscow Treaty) between the United States and Russia, this number was to decline to no more than 2, operationally deployed strategic nuclear warheads. Buy The Official History of the UK Strategic Nuclear Deterrent: Volume I: From the V-Bomber era to the coming of Polaris, (Government Official History Series) 1 by Jones, Matthew (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on Reviews: 1. Development of strategic nuclear delivery systems: long-range bombers, ICBMs and SLBMs, and presidential decisions on nuclear force levels Interest in greater warhead accuracy and the development of multiple reentry vehicle (MRV) and multiple independently targetable reentry vehicles (MIRV) technology during the late s and the s.

Washington, D.C., Ma - Last month’s posting by Robert S. Hopkins on “How the Strategic Air Command Would Have Gone to Nuclear War” provided incredible detail on SAC procedures during the s.

Strategic Air Command veteran Bruce Blair takes the story in to the s, with an extraordinary account, based on personal experience, of how SAC would have carried out its. to every nuclear warhead fielded by the British armed forces was either copied from a U.S.

weapon or designed and built in the U.S. Britain's own contribution to its strategic nuclear force (defined as the nuclear force that could attack, from its normal.

Royal Air Force, youngest of the three British armed services, charged with the air defense of the United Kingdom and the fulfillment of international defense commitments. During World War II, pilots of the RAF distinguished themselves in the Battle of Britain and conducted a strategic bombing campaign on Germany.

The V Bomber Force was the nickname given to Britain’s three bombers during the Cold War that were capable of delivering nuclear bombs and formed part of Britain’s nuclear deterrent. The V Bomber Force was made up of the Vickers Valiant, the Avro Vulcan and the Handley Page Victor.Polaris proved to be reliable, and its second-strike capability conferred greater strategic flexibility than any previous British nuclear weapons system; but it had a limited lifespan, and was expected to become obsolete by the s.

It was considered vital that an independent British deterrent could penetrate existing and future Soviet anti-ballistic missile (ABM) capabilities.Abstract.

If the Special Relationship existed anywhere, it was in the sphere of defence. 1 For John Dumbrell, nuclear co-operation (along with signals intelligence sharing under the UKUSA agreement) ‘formed the essence and beating heart of the Cold War “special relationship”’, allowing Britain to act as a great power by proxy.

2 Yet, in addition to Cuba and British Guiana, the proposal.